Curaprox Black is White Review

Curaprox Black is White header image

Lifestyle habits can cause stains to build up up on the outside of the teeth and make them look darker than they once were.

This product may make your teeth appear whiter, by removing surface stains.

It will not change the natural colour of your teeth in the same way that professional whitening / bleaching can.

To learn the best way to whiten your teeth, read our article on the best whitening methods which explains all you need to know, or to see our full range of whitening content, visit our teeth whitening hub page.

Pros

  • Safe for everyday use
  • A score of 59 on the Relative Dentin Abrasivity (RDA) scale
  • No bleaching agents within the paste
  • Provides protection against decay

Cons

  • One of the more expensive options
  • Will not whiten teeth for all
  • Particular ingredients used to make the teeth look whiter than they might actually be

Does it actually work?

We understand you want whiter teeth, but this might not be the right product for you.

Tooth whitening is a complex process and every person’s circumstances and results are different (although the adverts and claims from many manufacturers don't make this clear).

This product may work to remove surface stains from your teeth, but it will not change the natural colour of your teeth in the same way that professional whitening / bleaching will.

Teeth whitening - a quick explainer

There is a general misunderstanding of how whitening products work, which is why we've covered the topic in detail.

Some products, such as the one being reviewed here, remove stains. This is not the same as professional bleaching carried out by a dentist, and this is where much of the confusion stems from.

Before choosing a product or procedure, it’s important to understand the basics. This small investment of time will save you money and improve your oral health.

Whether opting for a stain removal product or professional bleaching, there are cost-effective options available, which we cover throughout our content.

We encourage you to learn more about teeth whitening, and the following articles (created by our in-house dentist)  are a great place to start:

If you're interested in whitening, our overall advice is to visit the dentist before using a whitening product, but you can find a more detailed explanation of this by reading the links shared above.

We've also created this short video, which further explains how stain removal products may not work the way you think:

Watch Our Teeth Whitening Video Course

Before & after results

Everyone’s teeth are different.

Our lifestyles, genetics and medical conditions all have an influence on our teeth.

Some people have heavily stained teeth, whilst others do not.

Curaprox Black is White works by removing surface stains and may make your teeth appear whiter, but it will not change the natural colour of your teeth.

The results you achieve by using Curaprox charcoal toothpaste will be different to me.

I have tried many different products and have little to no staining on my teeth.

Because of these circumstances, it would therefore be inaccurate to show before and after images to suggest what results you might get, because simply put, your before and after results may be very different.

However, to give you an idea, visit our teeth whitening before and after page, and you can see the kind of results you can expect from a stain removal product such as this, and the results you can expect from professional bleaching.

Cost

The suggested selling price is £19.99, that is for a tube of the paste and 1 x Curaprox manual toothbrush.

Or you can buy it for about £15 without the toothbrush.

Where To Buy

With little difference in the price, there is no best place to buy it form.

You can get it from Curaprox directly, Amazon and Boots

Preview Product Rating Price
Curaprox Black Is White Toothpaste Curaprox Black Is White Toothpaste 22 Reviews £19.99 £16.95

Taste, Packaging etc

Curaprox is a known brand in Europe but not one you see extensively on the shop shelves.

It will be a brand your dentist is familiar with though.

Founded in 1972 the Swiss firms’ products have always been of high quality and typically command a premium price tag.

Prices have gotten better though and their soft bristled toothbrush the CS5460 is our favourite manual toothbrush.  In fact, it often comes bundled with this paste, subject to where you buy it from.

Black is White is one of their newer products and blends a quality paste with the appealing properties of activated charcoal.

The idea is it not only cleans your teeth well but helps make them appear whiter (by removing stains) and doing so without being very abrasive.

Curaprox makes 2 activated charcoal toothpastes.

For the most part, they are the same.

  • Black is White – Black coloured paste and packaging – Fresh lime-mint flavour
  • White is Black – White coloured paste and packaging – Extra mild taste

Both come in a 90ml tube, which should be enough for about 3 months use.  You need only a pea sized amount on the brush head each time you use it.

The tube stands upright on the screw cap.  I personally would prefer a flip lid, I find them easier to use, particularly 1 handed.

Smart and stylish the tube is, it does stand out and look and feel great.

It has a matt touch to it with a very slight accent and gloss finish to a pattern that runs over roughly half of the front of the tube.

When you first get the tube, a silver foil seal is over the top of the tube to keep the paste in.

Once opened, Curaprox suggests using it within about 6 months.

Unlike a lot of the charcoal powder alternatives, the paste is much easier to use and a lot less messy.

Although the charcoal is in part what makes the paste black in colour, I did not experience the same level of staining to the toothbrush bristles and other surfaces that charcoal powder in its pure form achieves.

Black is White can be used as a daily toothpaste and is not designed to be used in addition to a regular toothpaste like many other activated charcoal products are.

You brush your teeth like you would with any other toothpaste.  After brushing, your mouth is left with a grey coating to it.  Most can be spat out, that said, some may still feel the need to rinse if there is a residue left behind.  

Rinsing does go against NHS guidelines, but at times it feels necessary otherwise you are left with a grey residue on the teeth.

In our detailed article on charcoal toothpaste there is discussion and explanation on the effects and suitability of charcoal based products for teeth cleaning. 

This is actually one of the more highly regarded within this space.

I actually found the paste ok to use, the taste was a little different to the typical mint you expect.  I didn’t get the same punchy freshness from the lime-mint of this tube, but my teeth did feel clean and my breath fresh.  

Whilst personally I don’t have any particular desire to stick to only all natural products, this paste does contain a large number of ingredients, more than many other pastes.

The full list of ingredients are as follows:

Aqua, Sorbitol, Hydrated Silica, Glycerin, Carbon Black, Bentonite, Aroma, Decyl Glucoside, Sodium Monofluorophosphate, Cocamidopropyl Betaine, Tocopherol, Mica, Xanthan Gum, Hydroxyapatite (Nano), Titanium Dioxide, Microcrystalline Cellulose, Maltodextrin, Potassium Acesulfame, Sodium Benzoate, Potassium Chloride, Potassium Sorbate, Menthyl Lactate, Methyl Diisopropyl Propionamide, Ethyl Menthane Carboxamide, Sucrose, Zea Mays Starch, Stearic Acid, Cetearyl, Alcohol, Citrus Limon Peel Oil, Citric Acid, Lactoperoxidase, Glucose Oxidase,Amyloglucosidase, Potassium Thiocyanate, Tin Oxide, Hydrogenated Lecithin, Limonen, CI 75815, CI 77289

What all these do and why so many are needed is a little beyond me. I am sure the science would show why.

One of the ingredients here, hydroxylapatite is beneficial to the teeth as it creates a thin film on the teeth and even fills small pits in the teeth to protect the tooth and the enamel coating.

Perhaps most importantly, it contains 950 parts per million of fluoride, an ingredient that most dental professionals consider essential in a paste to help keep your teeth healthy and protected.

Most charcoal based products tend to be fluoride free.

I am not sure I am a fan of the inclusion of Titanium Dioxide.  It actually works in such a way that it filters the light that hits the teeth to make them look even whiter.  

This, therefore, makes the whitening effect a bit of trickery, rather than flat out great results.  However, perceived whiteness, for the most part, will leave users happy.

There is a lot of content online that preaches the benefit of activated charcoal as a way of whitening the teeth and there is some truth to this, but pure activated charcoal or this Curaprox paste is not a guaranteed whitening fix for your teeth.  

Lets me take just a moment to reiterate here that this paste is not technically whitening the teeth.  It is a stain removal product.  It removes discolouration on the exterior surface of the tooth, which may make the teeth appear whiter, but it does not actually change the natural colour of the tooth.

Smokers and heavy coffee drinkers with a perhaps less than perfect brushing routine will likely see the biggest improvements and ‘whitening’ effect.

All whitening toothpastes or powders work in this way.  The exception being those few that contain peroxides or bleaches, of which, few exist in the UK today.

Black is White does not contain bleach or peroxides.

If you want a dramatic colour difference, the best course of action is to undergo a professional cosmetic whitening treatment, carried out by a registered dental professional.

So how does it work?

The activated carbon absorbs stain particles and gently eliminates them.  It is the natural properties of the carbon that make it effective.

Those same particles can also help absorb the bacteria and odour causing bacteria that grows in the mouth.

Many dentists have expressed concern over the current use of activated charcoal for cleaning and whitening teeth.

Whilst there is some science to suggest and confirm it could work, there are a lack of clinical trials and supporting evidence as to the long term effects of using such.  As such dental professionals will always remain cautious about making recommendations and typically suggest tried and tested pastes.

Unlike some of the competing products, Curaprox has done something particularly important to show they are above the rest and how this is safe to use as a daily toothpaste.

They have had the paste measured on the Relative Dentin Abrasivity (RDA) scale.

The scale runs from 0-250 and is categorised as follows:

  • 0-70 – Low abrasive
  • 71-100 Medium abrasive
  • 101-150 Highly abrasive
  • 151-250 Regarded as harmful limit

Curaprox comes in at 59, well within the lowest category for abrasion.

Anything under 250 is considered safe in the eyes of the American Dental Association (ADA) and although the NHS make no specific comment on it, their views tend to align with that of the ADA.

Every toothpaste has a different level of abrasivity.  A large proportion of popular pastes come in under 150.

Given the concerns that dental professionals have with charcoal and this RDA rating, it is perhaps no surprise that dental hygienists, Patti DiGangi, Judy Zack Bendit state in an article on Dentistry IQ

What we do know, as of this writing, is there is only one toothpaste containing activated charcoal that appears to be safe. Black is White toothpaste (Curaprox Inc.)

With a £19.99  price tag is one of the most expensive pastes available today. That does include our favourite manual toothbrush from Curaprox too.

Without it, as per the tube I purchased, you can get this for about £15.

It’s not your average £5 tube of paste though.

Charcoal based products typically retail from about £5-15 up, so there is some justification in the higher price and of course the brand and the RDA rating commands a premium too.

All this said, a recent Supershoppers test found that there is little difference between the amount of stains removed by a whitening toothpaste compared to a regular toothpaste. So do you need a whitening paste after all? We explore this further in our post on the best whitening toothpaste.

Ingredients

Aqua, Sorbitol, Hydrated Silica, Glycerin, Carbon Black, Bentonite, Aroma, Decyl Glucoside, Sodium Monofluorophosphate, Cocamidopropyl Betaine, Tocopherol, Mica, Xanthan Gum, Hydroxyapatite (Nano), Titanium Dioxide, Microcrystalline Cellulose, Maltodextrin, Potassium Acesulfame, Sodium Benzoate, Potassium Chloride, Potassium Sorbate, Menthyl Lactate, Methyl Diisopropyl Propionamide, Ethyl Menthane Carboxamide, Sucrose, Zea Mays Starch, Stearic Acid, Cetearyl, Alcohol, Citrus Limon Peel Oil, Citric Acid, Lactoperoxidase, Glucose Oxidase,Amyloglucosidase, Potassium Thiocyanate, Tin Oxide, Hydrogenated Lecithin, Limonen, CI 75815, CI 77289

Safety

As a well known and generally well respected brand within the dental health industry, Curaprox is not putting that reputation on the line with this product.

Activated charcoal is a particularly popular product within the health and beauty space at the moment.  However, when it comes to your oral health, there are questions over its safety.

Dentists generally suggest using with caution as there is limited clinical evidence to prove its effectiveness or long term impact on the teeth.

Our guide to charcoal toothpaste, goes into a lot of detail, looking at different viewpoints.

Whilst it is fair to argue that they are cashing in on the current trend, by including activated charcoal within their paste, it is great to see that they have taken a very conscientious approach, having it tested and achieving an RDA score of just 59.

RDA stands for Relative Dentin Abrasivity and is a scale upon which products are rated.

A rating of 0-70 is very low and contains those products most safe to be used on the teeth and gums.

Many products have not been tested and are thought to rank much higher on the scale, which is why oral health professionals are concerned about potential daily use.

The reality here is that whilst charcoal in its raw state is abrasive, by the time it hits your teeth in this paste it really isn’t and is likely no more abrasive than the toothpaste you are currently using.

Curaprox has too made sure a reasonable amount of fluoride is included in the toothpaste, appeasing those who believe it is an essential ingredient.

Is it eco-friendly?

I have heard of many people buying products, trying them and realising that they either do not work, don’t taste great or are simply not right for them.

Ultimately the product ends up in the bin, having hardly been used in most cases.  This is a waste for you and an impact on the environment.

I don’t want you to waste your money and have to do this, so do take the time to familiarise yourself with this product as best as possible before deciding whether it is right for you.

I can speak first hand when I say this paste does not have the taste, texture and awkward user experience that is most commonly associated with activated charcoal products.  So, even if you don’t achieve the results you want, there are a few reasons why you can’t see this product through to the end of the tube if you do buy it.

What we would like to see improved

In most instances, what I want to see improved is the companies selling whitening toothpaste to be clearer about how they work and what the likely results are going to be for users.

This is no easy feat, but more can be done.

Teeth may appear whiter for some users after using this toothpaste, but this will not be the case for all.

As I have indicated, the results depend on how much, if any existing staining you may have. It is this information that needs to be more widely advertised.

Curaprox are far from the worst offenders and in many ways undersell their product and what it offers, particularly as it is one of the safest options.

Ratings / Conclusion

As we’ve mentioned in the results section, it’s difficult for us (or anybody else) to systematically test numerous whitening products.

For this reason, we have chosen to omit star ratings.

However, below you can find a summary of our closing thoughts.

Activated charcoal products have gotten a reputation for whitening the teeth.

It is this ingredient that helps Black is White achieve some stain removal results for some users.  

However, it is more than just about stain removal and overall dental health does come into play.

Safe for everyday use, this paste can fit within your daily life with more ease and less concern than some other activated charcoal products.

Being a paste rather than a powder it is also more manageable and less messy.

Curaprox commands a premium which quite frankly is hard to justify when a regular tube of toothpaste is just as good and a lot cheaper.

Preview Product Rating Price
Curaprox Black Is White Toothpaste Curaprox Black Is White Toothpaste 22 Reviews £19.99 £16.95

FAQ

  • Where can I buy Curaprox Black is White toothpaste?
  • Does it contain peroxides?
    • No
  • What does it taste like?
    • A zesty flavour to the paste.
  • How does it work?
    • The principle behind how it works is that the charcoal particles in the paste absorb the stain creating particles whilst other ingredients in the paste help protect the teeth.
  • How much should I use?
    • A pea sized amount like you would with regular toothpaste.
  • How long should I brush for?
    • It is advised to brush for 2  minutes, twice a day.
  • Does it hurt?
    • I had no sensitivity, pain or side effects from using this.  Should you should gain additional sensitivity or side effects as a result of using it, stop doing so and consult a dentist.
  • How long does it last?
    • You should get roughly 3 months from the tube of paste.
  • Is it safe? / Does it damage the enamel on my teeth?
    • The manufacturer suggests it is safe.  It has a low RDA rating and has been endorsed by dental professionals. It is one of the safest charcoal toothpastes available and will do little in the way of damage to the enamel on your teeth.

Your Opinions

Do you own or have you used the Curaprox Black is White?

Are there certain things that you really like or dislike?

Let me and other readers of this article know what you think, by commenting below.  Your feedback and opinions are incredibly valuable.

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