HiBrush Review

HiBrush Review - Header Image

Pros

  • None

Cons

  • It doesn’t clean the teeth very well
  • The mouthpiece is too small
  • The mouthpiece is too loose and flexes too much
  • No battery status
  • Poor quality

The 3 BIG Questions about the HiBrush Sonic Toothbrush

If you are short of time, the answers to the following 3 questions should let you know all you need to about the HiBrush mouthpiece toothbrush. If I have missed something, let me know in the comments.

If you want more detail, you can read the full HiBrush review further down the page.

1. Is there anything drastically wrong with this toothbrush?

Yes.

It does not clean the teeth very well at all. Do not buy this brush.

Stick to a regular electric (we recommend a few below) or manual toothbrush — both will do a much better job if used correctly.

We rate products on a scale of 1 to 5, which has never been a problem until now because we have never come across a product that deserves 0 stars.

HiBrush, however, deserves 0 stars (it does not clean the teeth at all), so while our system shows a 1 star review, 0 is more appropriate.

2. Which other brushes should I consider?

HiBrush is a little unique and there are few alternative options.

Similar products are listed within our mouthpiece toothbrush article, but currently, I am unable to recommend any at the time of review.

Whilst not a mouthpiece toothbrush, you might want to consider 30 Second Smile. Designed more like a regular toothbrush, it is able to clean both the top and bottom teeth at the same time, thanks to the 2 brush heads.

However, a better investment would be in the Oral-B Pro 2 2500, which we rate as the best electric toothbrush, all things considered.

A cost effective, strong performing electric toothbrush, the small round head cleans the teeth really well.

It boasts a 2 week battery life, a built in timer and pacer to encourage brushing for the right amount of time and comes with a pressure sensor to stop you brushing too hard.

And most importantly, when used correctly, it cleans the teeth really well, something HiBrush does not.

Our Choice
Oral-B Pro 2 2500 CrossAction Electric Toothbrush Rechargeable Powered by Braun, 1 Black Handle, 2 Modes Including Gum Care, 1 Toothbrush Head, Travel Case, 2-Pin UK Plug, Colour May Vary
Electric Toothbrush, 30 Second Smile TSS300 White Electronic Power Rechargeable Toothbrush with Reciprocating Motion, Brushing Speed Setting, 6 Micro Brush Heads
Brush Name
Oral-B Pro 2 2500
30 Second Smile
Customer Rating
-
Electric Teeth Rating
5/5
4/5
Price
£30.00
£201.94
Prime
-
Our Choice
Oral-B Pro 2 2500 CrossAction Electric Toothbrush Rechargeable Powered by Braun, 1 Black Handle, 2 Modes Including Gum Care, 1 Toothbrush Head, Travel Case, 2-Pin UK Plug, Colour May Vary
Brush Name
Oral-B Pro 2 2500
Customer Rating
Electric Teeth Rating
5/5
Price
£30.00
Prime
Electric Toothbrush, 30 Second Smile TSS300 White Electronic Power Rechargeable Toothbrush with Reciprocating Motion, Brushing Speed Setting, 6 Micro Brush Heads
Brush Name
30 Second Smile
Customer Rating
-
Electric Teeth Rating
4/5
Price
£201.94
Prime
-

3. Where is the best place to buy the HiBrush 360° automatic toothbrush?

https://hitoothbrush.co is the website address for HiBrush, where you can make a purchase of the brush and associated items.

They only sell through their website.  It is not available from any other retailers.

Why should you listen to us?

Electric Teeth is an independent organisation with a mission to simplify dental health.

Our team is a mixture of consumers and dental professionals.

We strive to create honest, informative content, telling you the facts, good or bad.

We are not sponsored by big brands or healthcare companies. Our site is funded by affiliate revenue and ads, but we only recommend products that we have tested and truly believe to be worth your money.

Why not watch this short video to find out all about us?

And now for a bit more detail….

This toothbrush is a bit different to those that you might be familiar with.

Where a regular brush is designed to clean just 1 surface of a tooth at any one time, this brush has been designed to clean all the teeth at the same time.

Although HiBrush refers to this as a sonic toothbrush, I call this a mouthpiece toothbrush.

Some might refer to it as a mouthguard toothbrush, an auto toothbrush or as the box refers to it as, a 360 degree electric toothbrush.

It comes to market a little after a couple of successful crowdfunding campaigns, notably Amabrush, Ufunbrush and Y-Brush, which prove the desire for such a product.

Mimicking the design and features, even with several million Euros of funding, Amabrush have failed to deliver an effective working product, as you will see in my review of Amabrush.

Who are HiBrush?

HiBrush is a brand that have emerged in just a few months. Until I saw an advert I was not aware of them, despite having written about toothbrushes for several years and having been following these mouthpiece style toothbrushes closely.

Their website offers no real information about them or where they have come from and why they exist.

It does offer a contact telephone number, email address and a contact form. There is no physical address.

Whilst at first glance the site might look satisfactory, when you analyse it, the content, structure etc are relatively poor.

Just read some of the so-called 5 star reviews which don’t really sound like they apply to the products HiBrush are selling.

From what I can tell, HiBrush is nothing more than a name/brand that is used for marketing purposes. The actual product that is delivered is not labelled in any way with HiBrush.

This is because HiBrush is operating what is known as a drop-shipping model.

Essentially, they are selling a product made by someone else. They do not design or manufacture the products themselves.

It is a bit like going into Boots to buy a toothbrush. Most brushes are made by other companies, Boots just sell them.

The difference with HiBrush, is that the whole sales process is poor in comparison and you would think that HiBrush makes their own brush.

Learn more about this in the next section.

HiBrush is a copy of V-white

The actual product you receive when buying from the HiBrush website is a product branded V-White. I know, because I have made the purchase and this is what I received.

V-White is a brand (owned by a Hong Kong based company) I am familiar with.

The company behind this brand actually launched its own crowdfunding campaign, similar to that of Amabrush and Y-Brush.

You can see their campaign here on Indiegogo.  They raised $399,485, which is approx £310,000.

Their funding was successful and allowed them to make the product a reality.

Sadly the product they made was of poor quality and far below the expectations of backers. You need only read some of the comments.

This hasn’t stopped them continuing to make and resell it.

It is available for sale on many marketplaces, including Amazon.

However, their biggest market has to be drop shipping companies.

There is a business model called drop shipping. This is a process of selling products through your own website, but these products are manufactured and dispatched by another company.

You or I could set up such a company within just a few hours if we wanted, you don’t necessarily need to be a registered business.

In many cases, the products are made and dispatched from the far east, in countries like China. The seller you actually think you are buying the product from rarely sees or touches the product.

Due to the costs associated with production in the far east, it makes for a very lucrative business model for some, selling to the more wealthy western countries.

Drop shipping exists in many markets and is a viable business model, although product quality and service can vary significantly.

Sometimes you would not know the product is actually made by another company as the packaging has no branding on it, often plain. Some of the largest drop shippers will have products labelled with the brand.

Many of these drop shippers then use targeted adverts to market directly to potential customers, driving traffic to their website and fueling sales.

In this instance, the parent company of V-White are distributing their toothbrush through drop shipping marketplaces like www.aliexpress.com and www.alibaba.com.

You and I could buy direct from these marketplaces if we wanted.

This means other companies or individuals can buy and sell V-White through their own website, and this is what is happening in the case of HiBrush.

HiBrush is nothing more than a name for the website. What they are actually selling is V-White.

With a bit of searching, you will see many other companies selling the exact same product.

You can tell this from the photos, descriptions and the actual products people receive.

Others names for V-White

Other brands I have come across that are selling the same V-White product as I write this review are:

  • HiBrush
  • Dentabrush
  • Britebrush
  • WhiterUp
  • Nkdsmile
  • Yessmile
  • Brush Ease
  • Autobit
  • Cyclone Brush

Depending on what you read will also depend on the name given to the product.

V-White actually call it and label it on the box as 360° Electric Toothbrush With Cold Light.

Other names for it include:

  • 360° Electric toothbrush
  • 360° toothbrush
  • Auto toothbrush
  • Automatic toothbrush
  • Mouthpiece toothbrush
  • Mouthguard toothbrush

Essentially what I am saying here, is that there are few companies actually making their own mouthpiece style toothbrush. Be aware in many instances, whilst the website might be under a different name, it is quite likely V-White or a replica of this that you will receive if you order.

Not having purchased from all these companies I cannot say the products won’t be better, but I highly doubt it.

How does it work?

HiBrush is different to most toothbrushes you might be familiar with.

Instead of cleaning 1 surface of the teeth at any one time by moving the brush around the mouth, HiBrush is designed to clean all the teeth and all the surfaces at the same time, thanks to the design of the mouthpiece.

You bite gently into the mouthpiece and the silicone bristles make contact with the front, back and top of the teeth on both the upper and lower jaw.

As the cleaning action is designed to clean all surfaces at the same time, it can do so in less time if you were brushing with a regular toothbrush.

You should brush for at least 120 seconds. This means that for the average mouth with 32 teeth, you clean each surface for just 1.25 seconds.

With HiBrush, according to the product description, every surface is cleaned for a minimum of 10 seconds, because all teeth are brushed simultaneously.

This means: every surface gets brushed 8x longer and the total tooth brushing duration is 12x less (10 seconds instead of 120).

All well and good, but despite the website suggesting there is no 10 second cleaning mode, there isn’t such a mode. The modest lasts 45 seconds. So, actually, each surface is cleaned for 36x longer than a regular toothbrush. However, this doesn’t really matter as it doesn’t clean the teeth very well.

Variants of this brush

At the time of review, there is only 1 style of HiBrush toothbrush.

Although technically the same there are however a few different colour options, they are:

  • White
  • Black
  • Pink
  • Blue

There are also 3 different packages. The toothbrush supplied is the same, but what is included in the box and the price is different.

  • Sonic toothbrush by HiBrush
    • 1 x Brush handle
    • 1 x Mouthpiece
    • 1 x Charging stand
    • 1 x USB to micro USB cable
    • 1 x Documentation
  • Prime bundle
    • 1 x Brush handle
    • 2 x Mouthpiece
    • 1 x Charging stand
    • 1 x USB to micro USB cable
    • 1 x Documentation
    • 1 x Bleach n clean toothpaste
  • Deluxe bundle
    • 2 x Brush handle
    • 4 x Mouthpiece
    • 1 x Charging stand
    • 1 x USB to micro USB cable
    • 1 x Documentation
    • 2 x Bleach n clean toothpaste

You can get the different coloured handles in all package options.

Video review

What’s in the box

  • 1 x Brush handle
  • 1 x Mouthpiece
  • 1 x Charging stand
  • 1 x USB to micro USB cable
  • 1 x Documentation

Key Features

  • Cleans all the teeth at the same time
  • 3 cleaning modes
  • Silicone mouthpiece
  • Built in rechargeable battery
  • Automatic power off
  • Blue LEDs for whitening

Pros & Cons

Here are what I consider to be the pros and cons of the HiBrush sonic toothbrush.

The positives

  • None – I have nothing positive to say about this toothbrush.

The negatives

  • It doesn’t clean the teeth very well – It does not, nor cannot clean the teeth very well at all. You feel movement in the bristles but they don’t remove the plaque.
  • The mouthpiece is too small – Doesn’t reach the gumline or the teeth at the back of the mouth.
  • The mouthpiece is too loose and flexes too much – Easily detached from the handpiece and the silicone is far too flexible.
  • No battery status – No idea how much power remains in the battery.
  • Poor quality – Everything about this product is bad. Exposed screws etc.

Design, Usability, Clean & General Use

If you order HiBrush, it can take several weeks to actually arrive, that is because it is shipped from China, but I did get a tracking number to follow its progress.

I did not have to pay any customs fees when it arrived in the UK from China, which is slightly unusual, given that this would normally be subject to such fees.

However, the customs label declared the value at just £5, not the £64 I paid. It did describe it as an electric toothbrush though.

The box it comes in is about the size of a mobile phone box.

I did not receive a HiBrush branded box, instead, V-White is all over the box. That is because the product sold via the HiBrush website is just V-White, although they do not make it abundantly clear.

Some images, do show the V-White logo/box, but it is not like the site says, you are buying V-White, the product is described as a sonic toothbrush, by HiBrush.

I am somewhat surprised to see it called a sonic toothbrush, it is not what name is given to most toothbrushes of this type. Although, the bristles are supposed to move at 48,000 times a minute.

On the box, it says ‘V-White 360° Electric Toothbrush With Cold Light’, as well as ‘AI Intelligent’, ‘Whitening Kit’ as well as ‘45 Sec toothbrush’.

I want to explain all of these and what they mean and why they are not all accurate, but I will do this after talking about the design of the brush.

The exact box contents is listed above in the ‘what’s in the box’ section.

Fundamentally the brush is made up of two key parts, the handpiece and the mouthpiece.

The handpiece and mouthpiece fit together to create the toothbrush.

Some may call the handpiece, the handle or core unit, but they all mean the same thing.

However, the design is different from a regular toothbrush as you can tell from the pictures.

The handpiece/handle was available to buy in four different colours, I opted for black.

It is shaped a little like a heart, or at least I think it is.

The 2 sides are curved like the edge of a circle, but the base is flat, so it stands upright.

At the top, the curve sweeps down back into the middle of the handle slightly, to create a shallow U shape.

From the centre of this U is a metal shaft which feeds into the motor inside. To this shaft connects the brush head/mouthpiece.

This top part of the handle is made from clear plastic, with a screw in each corner fastening it to the body. This clear plastic is to allow the blue LEDs to shine through. There is one LED either side of the motor shaft.

This clear plastic panel and exposed screws look really cheap.

The rest of the handle is coated in a smooth, but slightly grippy silicone.

The back of the handle is completely smooth, the sides have a slight ridge running centrally around the handle. This must be where the material has been fused during the manufacturing process.

The front of the handle has a mesh-like pattern with depressions that offer a bit more grip.

In the centre is a power icon to turn the brush on and cycle through the cleaning modes.

The flat base has 2 circular gold contacts that are present for charging.

Fairly small overall the handpiece measures 65 (w) x 60 (h) x 30 (d) mm.

It is quite light also and actually feels fairly solid.

Whilst the coating on the handle is not the best quality, it doesn’t feel terrible, it’s the same sort of feel as one of those cheap silicone phone cases you might have seen or used.

Supplied in the box is a single mouthpiece or brush head, whatever you would like to call it.

Made from food grade silicone, this is soft and can be used on the teeth without issue. Silicone is in fact preferred by some.

The images show best what the brush head looks like, but the best way to describe it is a U shaped piece of silicone.

On the outer and inner edge is a taller piece of material, with a depression in the middle.

This depression is the space in which your teeth sit.

On the inside of the U are 2 rows of bristles, angled at 45 degrees.

The top row is the longest.

These row of bristles are on both sides of the mouthpiece.

The whole design is such that it fits over the bottom and top row of teeth at the same time.

Within the U are 6 holes, which I guess allow moisture through. I am not sure of the exact purpose.

There is also a third and final row of bristles. Well, I say bristles, they are tiny raised dots, which I presume are designed to serve a function.

On the base of the U is a hole into which the metal shaft of the handpiece fits.

The mouthpiece is very flexible and can be easily bent. It springs back into shape, but it is much less rigid than the mouthpiece supplied with Amabrush.

It flexes too much in my opinion.

So, with the mouthpiece fitted to the handpiece, the idea is that the internal motor delivers the cleaning action to the bristles and the teeth are cleaned.

Here are where things start to get really interesting.

Placing the mouthpiece over one row of teeth and gently biting into it with the others, the mouth naturally closes so the mouthpiece fits both the upper and lower teeth. The handpiece sits just outside the mouth and the lips form a seal over and around the mouthpiece.

It certainly looks weird to use such a product, but this is the future right?!

Well before you turn the brush on, you can tell that the mouthpiece doesn’t quite fit right.

Everyone has a slightly different mouth, but according to Amabrush, the manufacturer of another mouthpiece style toothbrush, the variation is such that different sized mouthpieces are not required, a one size fits all is ok.

HiBrush, or should I say V-White just offer 1 size.

This size is smaller than Amabrush. I estimate it is about 25-30% smaller.

Couple this with the more flexible silicone mouthpiece and it feels like it is a much nicer fit in the mouth.

Amabrush left me almost gagging because it was so large and awkward to put into the mouth.

Feeling nicer in the mouth is one thing, sadly the size and design means that for me I could feel that mouthpiece did not reach the teeth at the back of the mouth and the bristles did not reach the gumline.

I have a fairly typical sized mouth in my opinion, so I expected a good fit.

This lack of proper fit is very concerning. The gumline and the very back teeth are amongst the areas most prone to plaque buildup, so its ability to clean the teeth are already limited.

Whilst I do also appreciate more flex in the mouthpiece, this thing is so flexible it feels cheap, week and poor quality.

Oh and if that was not worrying enough when I placed it in my mouth, the size and fit meant that as I closed my mouth around the mouthpiece my lips would often make contact with the handpiece and push the handpiece away from the mouthpiece in the mouth.

Whilst the handpiece didn’t fall off entirely, it was then loose from the mouthpiece. Fantastic, not!

Despite knowing that the chances of this cleaning my teeth properly were slim, I proceeded to try anyhow.

Now, according to the manual, you can use regular toothpaste with this mouthpiece.

No real instructions are given on how to place this, but I went with 3 small pea sized blobs on either side of the mouthpiece.

Some may run a U strip all the way over it I presume.

Given you only normally need just a single pea sized amount of paste, I ended up using way more than I would really need.

There is no mechanism to spread the paste.

You can also buy HiBrush/V-White ‘Bleach n Clean’ whitening toothpaste.

Unlike regular toothpaste, this is more of a foam which fills the mouthpiece more.

I did not buy this as it was not marked as important or essential.

I can tell, from having now used HiBrush, that there might have been some advantage to using this foam, as I was just left with lumps of toothpaste on my teeth after brushing.

Although the foam may offer better distribution, I suspect you get through it quite quickly and can feel like you have too much.

Toothpaste is only part of the tooth cleaning puzzle.

Regular toothpaste also gets caught up in the mouthpiece and is a real effort to remove. You almost need a brush to brush out the residue toothpaste from the mouthpiece.

Amabrush implemented a toothpaste pod, with a thinner paste. Whilst this did not work well, it was a smarter implementation I believe.

Right, to the cleaning then….

For the benefit of this review, I also went 24 hours without brushing to get a good plaque build up. I then used a plaque disclosing tablet to show what my teeth looked like before and after brushing.

Take a look at the photos below? Notice any difference?

Hibrush before and after cleaning photos using plaque disclosing tablets

The images demonstrate quite clearly my suspicions, this brush does not clean the teeth.

There is almost no difference in the amount of plaque on the teeth before and after brushing. My teeth are still covered in dye from the disclosing tablet.

The results are dire and alarming.

Companies like HiBrush are advertising these products like they are the next best thing and they do nothing.

Let me just reiterate that. This toothbrush cannot and does not clean the teeth, just look at the plaque that I had left on them.

I have not included the results, but I even brushed another 4 times with HiBrush including wiggling the brush around the mouth as much as I could. The results were not much better.

A manual or electric toothbrush, when used correctly will do a far better job.

Needless to say, my test concluded with my getting out my reliable electric toothbrush and removing all the plaque with one normal 2 minute cleaning session.

To clean my teeth, I used the first of three modes available on this brush. Known as strong toothbrushing, this cleaning mode lasted for 45 seconds.

Now, to be fair, I could feel the bristles moving and upon assessing the brush outside the mouth I can see the bristles vibrating rapidly. In fact, I think HiBrush moved the bristles more than Amabrush does.

However, despite this rapid vibration, even the laziest of toothbrushers would say that the clean was extremely poor.

I think I could have cleaned my teeth better with my tongue and finger.

You can feel the vibration in the mouth and it is a slightly odd sensation, but you soon get used to it.

The documentation provided in the box explains the very basics of the brush, just.

The language used is poor. It is supposed to be English, but I think the slang phrase ‘Chinglish’ is a better fit.

It suggests 4 different modes are available:

  • Strong tooth brushing
  • Comfortable tooth brushing
  • High frequency
  • Teeth whitening

However, the fourth, teeth whitening mode results in no brush head movement. Instead the 2 blue LEDs in the top of the handpiece light up and shine onto the mouthpiece and front teeth — more on this in a moment.

There was a difference in the intensity of the vibration on the other 3 modes, but I can’t say any mode cleaned better than the other.

No cleaning mode was uncomfortable, but the comfortable mode did not feel any different, aside from vibration intensity. I think it was supposed to be more gentle on the teeth and gums, but the bristles don’t reach the gums so you won’t get the benefit.

With just one power button on the handle, each mode is selected by pressing the power button multiple times to cycle through the modes.

One of the reasons these toothbrushes have risen to prominence is because they (supposedly) brush all the teeth at the same time, thus taking less time to brush the teeth overall.

I believe this is why some refer to them as automatic, or 360 degree brushes; because the mouthpiece does the cleaning there is no need to move the brush around the mouth like a conventional toothbrush.

HiBrush suggested at the time of sale that the brush cleaned the teeth in 10 seconds. It does not.

There is no 10 second cleaning mode on this brush. Every mode was about 45 seconds.

I say about 45 seconds because I am not convinced the timer built in was accurate either. During my tests, each mode seemed to last a fractionally different amount of time.

I feel the sales message is somewhat confused.

Competitor Amabrush does have cleaning modes that last 10 seconds.

So realistically, even if this worked you are cutting your brushing time by 75 seconds each time.

One potentially redeeming feature is that at the end of a cleaning cycle the brush turns itself off automatically. Then again, you want to turn it off, if it isn’t doing the job it is supposed to do.

Oh, and from what I could tell, when it powered off automatically, the next time you turn it on, it restarts in the last mode you used. This is ok, but you then have to cycle through the modes to find the one you want, if you want a different one. It can take some time to work out which is which.

Now, that whitening mode then.

The brush head does not move and the handpiece shines blue light from the top handpiece onto the teeth for 15 minutes.

The idea is you leave this in your mouth the whole time. Not only is this awkward, as you might suspect by now, it is a complete waste of time.

In theory, blue light can cause the light to reflect slightly differently on the surface of the teeth, to give a temporary whitening effect. Many whitening kits and even toothpastes offer such.

I believe the V-White toothpaste may have an agent in it, which when used, will enhance this further, but only temporarily.

If using your own toothpaste like I was the specific ingredients may not be present.

However, my top tip is to brush your teeth regularly and correctly and the effects would be just as good in most instances. Or if you really want white teeth, go and get them professionally whitened.

If you want to know more about teeth whitening check out our teeth whitening hub page and video course. It includes all the information you likely need to know.

To say the claim of ‘whitening kit’ found on the box is a con might be a bit harsh, but I think this offering is a LONG way from any whitening kit.

Heck, with the poor cleaning performance of this brush, the stains that will build upon your teeth will make your teeth darker and more discoloured quicker than any whitening effects.

I mentioned at the start of this section how on the box, it says ‘V-White 360° Electric Toothbrush With Cold Light’ as well as ‘AI Intelligent’, ‘Whitening Kit’ and ‘45 Sec toothbrush’.

I believe I have mentioned all bar the AI Intelligent.

Well, this makes me laugh. AI or to give its full name, Artificial Intelligence is built into some toothbrushes, such as the Colgate E1 Smart toothbrush, but there is absolutely no intelligence built into this brush.

If there is, I would like it to learn how to clean my teeth properly.

Mouthpieces I believe should be replaced every 3 months. At £24 a time, this is far from cheap. More about this in the price section of the review.

The brush is supposed to be water resistant. I am sure it will resist water for some time, but I wouldn’t hold out much hope for it.

Whilst the handpiece feels solid, I don’t believe the materials are that great or the internal components necessarily very good. I feel this has been made to the lowest possible price.

Built inside is a rechargeable battery that lasts for 7 days. I talk about the battery life and warranty in further sections of the review.

Sadly no travel case or other accessories are supplied. Not that you need these things, a case can be handy. It can protect the hand and mouthpiece, but also stop the power button on the handpiece being switched on by mistake. It is very easy to do, the button is not that resistive.

All in all, this is one poor excuse for a product.

I don’t know how this has even made it to market, it is terrible.

It is a waste of money and resources.

Summary of Design, Usability, Clean & General Use

  • HiBrush is actually a V-White product
  • Almost heart shaped handpiece
  • The handpiece is coated in a smooth touch grippy silicone
  • Quality of the construction is poor
  • Silicone mouthpiece is too small
  • The mouthpiece is too flexible
  • Bristles don’t reach the gums
  • No 10 second cleaning mode as claimed, all 45 seconds
  • The mouthpiece can pop off the handpiece
  • It does not clean the teeth well at all
  • 3 cleaning modes
  • No noticeable difference in the cleaning modes performance
  • 2 blue LEDs to aid teeth whitening
  • Teeth whitening is a waste of time
  • Expensive replacement brush heads
  • No AI built into the brush
  • 7 day battery life
  • No travel case

Battery Life

The HiBrush website claims different battery life, depending page on the site you are reading.

The product page says 4 hours.

Go to the FAQ page and it says 7 days.

Well, I can confirm that with my hands on testing, a fully charged HiBrush, or should I say V-White managed 7 days.

I am not talking about 7 consecutive days. I mean 7 days, based on 2 brushing cycles per day.

As the default cleaning mode is 45 seconds long, this equates to 14 brushing cycles or a total battery life of 10.5 minutes.

I think you might agree, this is some way short of the 4h labelled on the HiBrush product page.

To be fair, this is a small unit and I wasn’t expecting world class battery life. In fact, I had expected just 7 days as this is the claim from V-White and many other brands.

However, this is still pretty poor. I would have thought they could have got more from the battery.

The average electric toothbrush now lasts at least 2 weeks. That though it based on 2 cleans totalling 2 minutes each time though, so that is 56 minutes of battery life.

Whilst Amabrush is a bit larger, it offered 150 days, yes, 4.5 months of use in comparison (based on 10 second cleans).

To be fair, it is not like we generally need it to have better battery life, but it would be nice right.

You wouldn’t even be able to take this on holiday for 2 weeks without the charger.

It does come with a charging stand in the box, when you want to recharge it.

The charging stand is functional, but not ideal.

Made from thin, light plastic the stand is white in colour and has an ovalish design.

On the base are 4 rubber feet and some regulatory/power information printed in the middle.

On one of the sweeping curved edges is a micro USB port, into which the provided USB to micro USB cable connection.

The cable is also white in colour.

The idea is you connect this to a USB port on your computer or laptop, to a USB wall socket or if you have one a USB plug.

I for example connected this to the USB plug that I had supplied with my smartphone.

If you don’t have one, you can buy these very easily.

This might not be ideal for bathrooms, particularly in the UK, so you may need to charge it elsewhere.

This design, however, does mean it is easier to use when travelling. Being so slim and light, it is easy to pop into a bag also.

On top of the pad is a small LED that lights up blue when power is connected.

There is the V-White logo and a recess with 4 small gold pins, sat within a small recess.

The gold pins are designed to make contact with the gold contact points on the base of the handpiece. There are only 2 on the bottom of HiBrush.

I found the brush sat on the stand best, when the front of the brush (the side with the power button) faced away from the front of the stand, where the power cable connects.

Whilst the brush will sit in place it is easy to knock it off, not a snug fit like some other charging stands.

I can’t help but think the stand is bigger than it needs to be. It could probably be half the size.

It takes 90 minutes to fully charge the brush.

When on charge, the blue LEDs on the HiBrush will flash, until it is fully charged and they will turn a solid blue.

Sadly there is no LED on the brush to indicate when the power is low. When the battery is flat, it just powers off.

Although a power cable has to be connected to the stand, the brush requires no cable to be connected directly into it, so it charges wirelessly.

Summary of Battery Life

  • 10.5 minutes of usage time or 7 days usage based on 2 cleans a day
  • Poor battery life considering the competition
  • Charging stand provided in box
  • Uses micro USB connector (USB cable provided)
  • It takes 90 minutes to charge fully
  • Blue LEDs flash when charging
  • Blue LEDs stay a solid blue when charged
  • No LEDs to alert when the battery is low
  • A charger is included in the box

Price & Where To Buy

The market for automatic/mouthpiece toothbrushes is very new and prices vary considerably.

Sadly, at the time of writing, there are not really any mouthpiece toothbrushes I can wholeheartedly recommend to try and offer a benchmark on price, for something that works.

Complicated further by the fact that most began life as a crowdfunding campaign, where particularly good deals are offered for backing such.

However, for the sake Amabrush retails for around £135 and Y-Brush could be purchased for around £80.

HiBrush suggests this has a retail price of about £160. Amazingly it is never sold at this price, well not that I have seen anyway.

I paid $74 which is approximately £64, when you include shipping at $8.

You could argue this is a reasonable price based on the above.

However, given the lack of positive attributes, I feel this is expensive. I cannot see £64 of value in this product.

Although Amabrush mouthpiece toothbrush does not perform much better, there are more things to be positive about what they offer. The product feels less scammy and that they are at least trying.

I am unable to comment on Y-Brush, as I have yet to go hands on with it.

An excellent, conventional electric toothbrush such as the Oral-B Pro 2 2500 will cost around £35, half the price of HiBrush.

As I have explained, there are other brands of the same mouthpiece toothbrush and prices seem to be anywhere between £30 through to around £80, depending on which you buy. That is quite a bit of variance, considering it is the same brush that is being sold in most cases and can be purchased from drop shipping websites for about $15!

With normal toothbrushes, you need to factor in the cost of replacement brush heads.

It is not clear how long these silicone bristled mouthpieces should last. I think 3-6 months might be the suggested time frame, but generally, 3 is best.

HiBrush are one of the few companies that list and sell replacement mouthpieces, or as they call them mouth trays.

These are supposedly worth £32, but sell for about £24, approximately a third of the price of HiBrush.

This brush head can be bought for just $5/£4 from a drop shipping website.

With toothbrushes we review here at Electric Teeth, we usually price them over a 3 year period, to give you an idea of ongoing ownership costs.

The cost of owning HiBrush would be approximately £317 or 29p per day.

This is actually roughly the same price as Amabrush.

Compared to a regular electric toothbrush, this is very expensive. Even some of the best and most feature rich electric brushes are cheaper than this.

Costs could easily be reduced if you purchased another brand.

For example at the time of writing, I can buy V-White on Amazon for around £35 with a pack of 2 mouthpieces costing £14, just £7 each.

Over 3 years the cost would be £112 or just 10p per day. This is much better value and much closer to the price of a conventional electric toothbrush.

I haven’t included the price of the special toothpaste that you ideally need to use, but I see little point really.

What I am ultimately saying here is no matter what the price of this product, do not buy it. Doing so would simply be a waste of money and resources.

Please note that all costs quoted are approximates and prices will vary based on location, supplier, time of purchase.  These figures should not be relied on as hard fact but as a guide, based on real information at the time of writing.

Summary of Price & Summary

  • Recommended retail price of £160
  • Generally available with 60% or more off RRP; circa £60
  • Replacement mouthpieces sell for £24
  • Works out at around 29p per day over 3 years
  • Other brands, offering the same product are considerably cheaper
  • Do not buy this or similar products, they are a waste of money

Reliability & Long Term Use

I cannot comment on the long term reliability as I would not want or ask anyone to use this for the long term.

There is no reference in the box, on the documentation or on the HiBrush website as to the length of the warranty period.

Usually, products like this have a 1-2 year warranty.

Their website does suggest you can return HiBrush, however, the implication is that this return period is just 30 days.

Despite having a return period, most companies/manufacturers then offer a longer warranty period, but there is no indication of this.

During these 30 days, you are able to claim a full refund, if you are not happy.

I have not tried to make such a claim, but if you make the mistake of buying this, you will want to do so, because I see no logical reason why you would want to use it.

Whilst I cannot back this up with evidence, based on the build quality and other attributes of this brush, I doubt it will actually prove very reliable.

It looks, feels and performs like a cheap knock-off.

Conclusion

DO NOT BUY this toothbrush!

Purchasing this mouthpiece toothbrush is a complete waste of your money, your time, effort and not to mention the resources that go into making it.

It is an embarrassment of a product. It does not clean the teeth in any way shape or form.

Don’t be fooled by the positive reviews found on the sales pages, anyone who gets hands on and uses this product will be able to tell within a few seconds that it does not do the job it is designed to do.

So poor is this product, this is the first toothbrush on our site ever to get a 0 star rating.

Stick to a manual or conventional electric toothbrush — your mouth will thank you.

Our Choice
Oral-B Pro 2 2500 CrossAction Electric Toothbrush Rechargeable Powered by Braun, 1 Black Handle, 2 Modes Including Gum Care, 1 Toothbrush Head, Travel Case, 2-Pin UK Plug, Colour May Vary
Electric Toothbrush, 30 Second Smile TSS300 White Electronic Power Rechargeable Toothbrush with Reciprocating Motion, Brushing Speed Setting, 6 Micro Brush Heads
Brush Name
Oral-B Pro 2 2500
30 Second Smile
Customer Rating
-
Electric Teeth Rating
5/5
4/5
Price
£30.00
£201.94
Prime
-
Our Choice
Oral-B Pro 2 2500 CrossAction Electric Toothbrush Rechargeable Powered by Braun, 1 Black Handle, 2 Modes Including Gum Care, 1 Toothbrush Head, Travel Case, 2-Pin UK Plug, Colour May Vary
Brush Name
Oral-B Pro 2 2500
Customer Rating
Electric Teeth Rating
5/5
Price
£30.00
Prime
Electric Toothbrush, 30 Second Smile TSS300 White Electronic Power Rechargeable Toothbrush with Reciprocating Motion, Brushing Speed Setting, 6 Micro Brush Heads
Brush Name
30 Second Smile
Customer Rating
-
Electric Teeth Rating
4/5
Price
£201.94
Prime
-

Electric Teeth Rating

Editor’s note: we rate products on a scale of 1 to 5, which has never been a problem until now because we have never come across a product that deserves 0 stars. HiBrush, however, deserves 0 stars (it does not clean the teeth at all), so while our system shows a 1 star review, 0 is more appropriate.

 

Size Guide

  • Height (without head) – 7cm / 2.75 inches
  • Height (with head) – 10cm / 3.93 inches
  • Width – 6.5cm / 2.55 inches
  • Thickness – 3cm / 1.18 inches
  • Weight (without head) – 91g / 0.2 lbs
  • Weight (with head) – 104g / 0.22 lbs

All are approximates

FAQ

  • What brush head does it come with and what alternative ones can be used?
    • The brush heads or mouthpiece supplied is a silicone moulded attachment, specific to this type of product. HiBrush do sell replacements/spares as do V-white and some of the other brands selling the same product.
  • Does HiBrush have a pressure sensor?
    • No.
  • Does HiBrush have Bluetooth?
    • No.
  • Does HiBrush come with a warranty & how long is it?
    • There is no information to suggest HiBrush comes with a warranty. Most products of this type come with a 1-2 year warranty as standard. HiBrush claim you can return it if faulty. You need to contact them to do this.
  • How long does the battery last?
    • The battery lasts 630 seconds, which is 10 and a half minutes. This is equivalent to 14 brushing sessions, or 7 days based on 2 brushing sessions per day.
  • Does it come with a charger?
    • Yes, a charging station is included with HiBrush. The brush sits on the recess, where the gold pins are located, whilst a micro USB to USB cable is used to offer power to the stand.
  • Can I use HiBrush in the shower?
    • In theory, it is IP rated and can get wet. I would not advise using it in the shower as I don’t think it will necessarily survive all that long, going by the quality of the rest of the product.
  • Does it come with a travel case?
    • No, a travel case is not included in the box.

Your Opinions

Do you own or have you used the HiBrush sonic toothbrush?

Are there certain features that you really like or dislike?

Let us know what you think about this brush and let others who may well be considering purchasing one know your opinions before they do.

Summary
Review Date
Reviewed Item
HiBrush
Author Rating
11stargraygraygraygray
Jon Love

About Jon Love

Jon is a leading voice on electric toothbrushes and has been quoted by mainstream media publications for his opinions and expertise.

Having handled & tested hundreds of products there really is very little he does not know about them.

Passionate about business and helping others, Jon has been involved in various online enterprises since the early 2000s.

After spending 12 years in consumer technology, it was in 2014 that he focused his attention on dental health, having experienced first-hand the challenge of choosing a new toothbrush.

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